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Courses Descriptions

Course Name Number Core * Professor Campus
Classical Mechanics PHY 313   GANGOPADHYAY, A Dartmouth
Wave Motion PHY 314   GANGOPADHYAY, A Dartmouth
Ocean Circulation and Modeling PHY 645   GANGOPADHYAY, A Dartmouth
Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics PHY 655 PO GANGOPADHYAY, A Dartmouth

* The "Core" column indicates whether the course is a "core" course, and if so, it's core area:

  • BO = Biological Oceanography core course
  • CO = Chemical Oceanography core course
  • PO = Physical Oceanography core course
  • PM = Policy / Management core course
  • Blank = Not a core course; an elective


Course Details

Classical Mechanics -- (Undergraduate course in lecture format)

Professor: GANGOPADHYAY, AVIJIT
PHY 313, 3 credits.
Core: Physical Oceanography
Course Webpage: n/a

Abstract:

Mechanics of particle systems including central force motion and two body scattering, non-inertial coordinate systems, Simple Harmonic Oscillations, Phase Space, Fourier series decompostion. Rigid body kinematics and dynamics, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods.


Wave Motion -- (Undergraduate course in lecture format)

Professor: GANGOPADHYAY, AVIJIT
PHY 314, 3 credits.
Core: Physical Oceanography
Course Webpage: n/a

Abstract:

Wave phenomena in mechanics, optics, fluids and acoustics. A study of wave equation and its applications with emphasis on the general properties of waves. Geophysical waves in fluids. Interference, diffraction, reflection, refraction and polarization.


Ocean Circulation and Modeling -- (Graduate course in distance learning format)

Professor: GANGOPADHYAY, AVIJIT
PHY 645, 3 credits.
This course is an elective.
Course Webpage: n/a

This course is not currently available for registration.

Supports the following Option Areas:

  • MASMA - Marine and Atmospheric System Modeling and Analysis
  • MOT - Marine Observation Technologies

    Abstract:
  • This course is divided in two parts. In the first half of the course, students are introduced to the concepts of circulation, namely the wind-driven and the thermohaline components, the concepts of geostrophy, Sverdrup dynamics, Ekman, Munk and Stommel problems, two-layer dynamics, stratification, and thermal and salt diffusion. The potential vorticity concept is discussed in some detail with respect to its balance and generation/maintenance in the major western boundary current regions. The major features of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans are discussed from a circulation and dynamics perspective.

    In the second half of the course, students learn the full set of primitive equations and the Bryan and Cox implementation of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM). As part of the numerical modeling effort, each student sets up a simple modeling exercise with MOM. Basin-scale modeling, regional modeling, and El Nino modeling are also covered. Students are also encouraged to learn about WOCE data sets over the Internet; data assimilation techniques are discussed in general overview framework.

    Course work includes one research paper on modeling a particular problem and two rigorous take-home examinations.


    Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics -- (Graduate course in lecture format)

    Professor: GANGOPADHYAY, AVIJIT
    PHY 655, 3 credits.
    Core: Physical Oceanography
    Course Webpage: n/a

    This course is not currently available for registration.

    Supports the following Option Areas:

  • MASMA - Marine and Atmospheric System Modeling and Analysis
  • MOT - Marine Observation Technologies

  • Abstract:

    This course covers the essential materials necessary to understand the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere interaction that is relevant for long- and short-term climate variability. Topics include: the dynamics of the tropical Pacific in terms of shallow water equations and the predictability of such simple climate models; societal implications of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO); the study of a basin-wide Pacific ocean circulation model in comparison to available in-situ and satellite data; the basics of data assimilation techniques, such as the Optimum Interpolation (OI) and the Kalman Filter; satellite data sets, such as GEOSAT, TOPEX/POSEIDON, NSCAT, and ERS2, and their impact on climate modeling; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO); and the linkage between different climatic events, such as the monsoon, ENSO, and NAO, in the context of global change and CLIVAR (the Climate Variability Program). During the semester, students will have an opportunity to interpret the state of the Pacific Ocean in real-time through Internet web sites.


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