People

PI / Graduate Students / Postdoctoral Researchers


Gavin Fay

GFAY_new
Assistant Professor
gfay@umassd.edu
+1 508 910 6363
@gavin_fay
Personal website
Google Scholar

 


Graduate students

FishingVessel

 
Amanda Hart
M.S. student
ahart2@umassd.edu
Amanda joined the Fay lab in the fall of 2016. She grew up in New Mexico and attended the University of Miami where she majored in Marine Science and Biology. Her MS thesis work will involve ecosystem models of New England fisheries that seek to include a broader range of environmental data and species interactions than current stock assessment models.

Schilpp

 
Liberty Schilpp
M.S. student
lschilpp@umassd.edu
Liberty earned her B.S. in Marine Conservation from the University of California, Berkeley. Her M.S. thesis is focused on evaluating factors contributing to variability in size-at-age for Northeast US groundfish, and the implications of size-based time-varying natural mortality in state-space stock assessment models for Gulf of Maine cod. (Main collaborator: Dr. Tim Miller, NOAA NEFSC)

Weston

 
Ashley Weston
M.S. student
aweston@umassd.edu
Ashley grew up fishing on the Chesapeake Bay. She attained a B.S. double major in Fisheries Conservation and Biological Sciences from Virginia Tech. She is currently working with groundfish stock assessments in the Gulf of Alaska, focusing on developing models that account for the effects of environmental drivers on fisheries resources and discerning robust selection tools for these models. In addition, she is investigating subsequent implications of future climate change within these stock assessments on current management policies. (Main collaborator: Dr. Carey McGilliard, NOAA AFSC)

Wildermuth

 
Robert Wildermuth
Ph.D. student
rwildermuth@umassd.edu
Google Scholar

Robert’s research interests focus on how to use quantitative tools to make effective management decisions with uncertain and incomplete knowledge. His PhD work is looking at how assumptions about the structure and function of marine social-ecological systems can affect decision-making. He is applying both quantitative and qualitative models in Bayesian statistical frameworks to analyze decision-support tools for managing the social-ecological system on Georges Bank, USA, including objectives of fisheries sustainability and human wellbeing. Robert earned a B.S. in Zoology and Biological Sciences at Colorado State University and a M.S. in Biology at Arizona State. Research topics included demographic effects of California sea lion aggressive behavior, sexually selected traits in the Trinidadian guppy, and oil spill impacts on marine mammal and mollusk populations. (Main collaborator: Dr. Sarah Gaichas, NOAA NEFSC)

MWinton

 
Megan Winton
Ph.D. student
mwinton@umassd.edu
Google Scholar

Megan’s research interests are centered on the development and application of statistical methods to improve understanding of the spatial ecology and population dynamics of highly migratory marine species. Her Ph.D. research is focused on developing frameworks to integrate electronic tagging data into population assessments for protected or prohibited species, with focus on geostatistical methods applied to loggerhead sea turtles in the Mid-Atlantic, and to white sharks off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Megan earned her M.S. in Marine Science at California State University Monterey Bay’s Moss Landing Marine Laboratory, and received her B.S. in Biology from Emory University. Megan has applied her quantitative analytical skills in positions at several research institutions, including Connamessett Farm Foundation and the NOAA Fisheries Northeast Fisheries Science Center. (Main collaborators: Dr. Heather Haas, NOAA NEFSC, Dr. Greg Skomal, Mass DMF)

 


Postdoctoral researchers

Trijoulet

 
Vanessa Trijoulet, PhD
Visiting Scholar UMassD, Postdoctoral researcher NOAA NEFSC
vanessa.trijoulet@noaa.gov
Google Scholar

Vanessa works in collaboration with NOAA Fisheries (Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Woods Hole) and SMAST on the development of a multispecies state-space fisheries assessment model for the Georges Bank stocks. Vanessa’s research focus is on marine ecosystem modelling, with interests in using modelling to study population-level interactions and improve conservation and management strategies. Vanessa obtained her PhD from the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, UK) where she applied bioeconomic models of grey seal predation impacts on the West of Scotland fisheries. Vanessa has a Master’s degree in oceanography, specialized in marine biology from the Oceanographic Centre of Marseille, and a Bachelor’s degree in Sciences and technique specialized in life sciences and marine biology from the University of La Rochelle. (Main collaborators: Dr. Kiersten Curti & Dr. Tim Miller, NOAA NEFSC)